IT in Media: in and out of the spotlight

We can forgive many industries for being slow adopters of the digital revolution but the media industry is not one of them.

This is an industry that has to keep pace with consumers. The entertainment, news, views, sport we consume must be instant, everywhere, on-demand and personalised. With an increasingly crowded marketplace, there’s no room for error and no time to sit still.

For some, keeping ahead of new technologies is easy, a new digital media company, for example, built from the start on a pure IP platform, is not concerned with the migration issues, which will affect a well-established public services broadcaster. There is no one-size-fits-all solution.

This is why the media and technology industry must converge. Media clients can save time and resource by learning from technology specialists and mastering the value in the creative content they’re producing.

Part of the battle to keep pace with their customers can be won through managing and maximising their assets. Surprisingly, it is these challenges that I hear most often from my customers in the media sector.

Hold the front page?

It may not feel like front page news but smart and efficient delivery can make all the difference. Without these processes in place, without automation and industrialisation, media companies will simply stop being competitive.

The most amazing content is rendered pointless if you haven’t brought it to the right audience, at the right time and in the right format.

Creative content is no longer enough. It’s hard to hear, because it should always be about the content, but getting the strategy and delivery right is becoming just as critical.

What next?

Away from the razzmatazz of consumer facing tech there is the beating heart of the industry behind that needs to be cared for.

The conversations we’re having most regularly with media clients’ center on exploring immediate opportunities for innovation in media data management and analytics, which inevitably brings us back to customer experience.

Four focus areas dominate both operational and strategic discussion:

1 Customer Experience The battle to win and retain viewers is central to every media company strategy.  How can digital smarts help media companies both anticipate and drive new customer behaviours and expectations?
2 Media Supply Chain The media supply chain becomes increasingly complex – not least because of the need to support multiple formats, platforms and geographies. How can you maximize agility and minimize time-to-market without compromising on quality-of-service or control?
3 Data Management All media business is increasingly data-driven, from infrastructure and content supply chain through to audience engagement. But how do you transform a media company to give it an edge through new data analytics?
4 Media Infrastructure Virtualization The dedicated and custom-built infrastructures traditionally formed and favored by media companies are no longer fit-for-purpose.  So how do you transition to agile IP-based infrastructures without compromise on quality or security?

In the lead-up to this year’s IBC conference in Amsterdam, I will be looking at each of these topics in a little more detail.

But one thing is clear for all media companies, from the latest start-up to the most well-established players: continuing digital transformation will remain the pattern for as long as people want to communicate – for as long as people want to share ideas, experiences and creativity.

The story will go on forever.

 

Follow our next articles as part of “IT in Media” Blog series for IBC 2017

At IBC 2017 in Amsterdam, we are exploring all four focus areas and sharing ideas and experiences with specific reference to some of our many media partnerships around the world

IBC is the world’s leading media, entertainment and technology show, exhibiting more than 1,700 of the world’s key technology suppliers and showcasing a debate-leading conference.

About Mauro Starinieri

Mauro leads the strategy, definition, implementation and promotion of the Atos offerings portfolio for the Media and Entertainment industry. In the last eleven years he has focused his career on this industry. He works closely with the teams who support Atos media clients around the world, ensuring that offer development is closely aligned with genuine customers’ needs. A key part of his job consists also of monitoring the continually changing market’s trends and needs, and of ensuring that Atos builds and sustains the specialist partnerships needed to deliver clear value to clients. He has a particular interest in digital media supply chain and the application of virtualization technologies and cloud delivery for enabling and supporting the digital transformation of the media companies.